Monthly Archives: September 2013


Getting Better Every Day

In a conversation with my 18 year old son the other day, the subject of gas prices came up. He said he remembered when gas was less than $2 per gallon. I told him I remembered when it was less than $1 per gallon. I’ve heard my dad say he remembers when gas was less than $.30 per gallon. I had just paid $3.45 per gallon. The pessimist inside me whispered, “Things are always getting worse.” I was reminded at that moment that it’s always a temptation to despair, to focus on circumstances as they go from bad to worse.

But I know that I should resist that temptation.

Since I am called to thankfulness, I should constantly cultivate an optimistic attitude. Sure, a gallon of gas costs more than $3. But a gallon of Starbucks coffee costs more than $15. I have to remind myself: never freak out over short-term vicissitudes, and consider just how good I’ve got it. I can drive along a winter road in a warm car, sipping the most expensive and best beverages in human history while still feeling like it’s a bargain. A trip that would have required arduous days or weeks now takes mere hours or days. People of long ago couldn’t have dreamed of the luxuries I take for granted every day.

We live in an age of abundance – even when it feels like we don’t – and we have the greatest opportunities ever to apply the best perspectives of the ages to the educational needs of our children today. We are in a very advantageous situation.

The time-honored principles, priorities, truths, and tenets of classical Christian education have proven over centuries of study to be the best road to academic excellence and moral development. Knowing this, we don’t let ourselves get tossed around by today’s negative news, trendy thinking, and pop-entertainment methodologies.

From the Greeks (who laid the intellectual foundation for Western democracy, art, and literature through the development of logic and the eloquent expression of rhetoric) – to the Romans (who continued building on this academic foundation) – to Christ Himself (through whom Peter and Paul were able to witness effectively to the Greeks and Romans in a wise and eloquent manner), Western learning and civilization have prospered when we’ve kept our eyes focused and our minds trained on the wisdom of God, as revealed in Scriptures and in the person of Christ.

We’re on the road to a very worthwhile destination at Regents Academy! A good school is getting better every day as we pursue the never-changing truths we are certain of. Oil prices will rise and fall, a cup of Starbucks coffee – at any price – lasts only a moment, but the wisdom of the ages as established and revealed by Jesus Christ will endure forever. His is an everlasting kingdom, and the future a secure one when the Lord of Glory holds it in His hands.

All wisdom and knowledge are to be found in Christ. We have been given the indescribable gift of knowing and imitating Him. At Regents Academy our commitment is to offer your children what they need most in school – the opportunity to grow in wisdom and knowledge, and to know Him from whom it comes.


Patched Up

Students began wearing their new Regents crest patches on their blazers yesterday.

Emma Terrell and Kyla Alders model them below.

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patch

At the center of the crest is the triquestra, traditional symbol for the Trinity, signifying that the Triune God is the center of our school. The lamp, book, and scales represent knowledge, understanding, and wisdom, which are biblical terms roughly synonymous with the three elements of the Trivium. “MMI” signifies the year Regents was founded: 2001. Twelve years later, we have 136 students, 25 staff members, 10 acres, and uncountable blessings from the Lord of Glory.

 


BU Visits RA

What a blessings it was to host Belhaven University representative Karlos Lyons today. Karlos spoke with Regents freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, sharing about the opportunities available at Belhaven University, a Christian university in Jackson, Mississippi.

Pictured below is Karlos standing in the back of the classroom with a number of Regents high school students.

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Regents alumna Miranda Kunk (2013) currently attends Belhaven.

 


Words of Wisdom from Douglas Wilson on the State of Classical Education Today

The CiRCE Institute recently published an interview with Douglas Wilson, a leading light in the classical Christian education movement, about the state of classical education today. We at Regents Academy are part of the rising tide of classical schools that are growing all around our land, and Wilson’s wisdom is much needed.

It’s been more than 30 years since you and your colleagues started Logos School in Moscow, Idaho, and more than 20 years since The Lost Tools of Learning came out. Since then classical Christian education has grown quite a bit, in no small part because of the work of ACCS and organizations like it. In looking back, what gives you the most satisfaction?
I think I would have to say that it is most gratifying that the movement now has enough history and momentum to continue on when I am out of the picture. We are well past our lift-off stage, and we can turn our attention to the work of consolidation, and deliberate expansion. I am very grateful to God for how far we have come.

What challenges have been most resolute in testing the mettle of this movement?
There is nothing new under the sun, and so our two great challenges have been the same as they have been for every form of culture building. Those challenges are failure and success. The challenge of looming failure is the challenge of keeping enough students enrolled, paying for the books, keeping teachers fed, and so on. Some schools are challenged every year with the daunting prospect of simply making it. The other great challenge is the challenge of success. You don’t have to worry about survival, and your waiting list goes around the block three times. One of the great challenges for our schools that have been successful (in this sense) is the challenge of staying true to the mission, and not becoming just another private prep school.

What do you foresee being most challenging moving forward? How can these challenges be overcome?
I believe that classical Christian education has proven itself academically, so — as a movement — I don’t think we need to worry about disappearing into nothing. I do think we need to worry about disappearing into something else. I am concerned that many of our schools are starting to measure success by how assiduously established colleges and universities are recruiting their graduates, and luring them with big time scholarships. But we are at the tail end of a higher education bubble, and so I don’t believe that this should be how we measure success. I would love to see a deepening commitment to Christian higher ed. I know that God calls some of our graduates into the existing system, and God bless them all. But I don’t want anybody going there under false pretenses. So I think the prep school vibe is a big temptation to be resisted.

What does the classical Christian education need for continued growth?
We need to deepen our bench. By this I mean providing a thorough classical Christian education to our next generation of teachers. That would be one thing. We also need to develop and enrich the curriculum choices that we have available to us. A lot has been done here, but much more needs to be done. We are trying to do our share in this, and are grateful to everyone who has a hand in it. For an example of the “next generation” kind of thing we are trying to do in this area, you could check out — www.logospressonline.com/.

Ideally, what would you like the movement to look like in ten years?
In ten years, I would like to see a great increase in the number of ACCS accredited schools. I would like to see resources developed (curriculum, online teachers, etc.) for schools that don’t have large numbers. And I would like to see the development of a large data base that would enable us to track our graduates and make note of their accomplishments.


A Gift that Keeps Our Patriotism from Flagging

Our friends at Woodmen of the World donated beautiful new US and Texas flags to Regents Academy. The flags are mounted on stands that remain in our Great Room. Brianna Lewis, mother of KPrep student Peyton, helped make the donation happen. Pictured below is Ruth Hoffmann and her 5th grade class, who hold the flags during the Pledge of Allegiance.

Thank you, Woodmen of the World and Mrs. Lewis, and may God bless America!

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Sam Alders Named National Merit Semifinalist

Congratulations to Regents Academy senior Sam Alders for his achievement as a semifinalist for the National Merit Scholarship.

About 1.5 million students in some 22,000 high schools enter the National Merit Scholarship competition annually when they take the Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT®). This serves as an initial screen of program entrants. Of these entrants, some 16,000 Semifinalists are designated on a state representational basis, in numbers proportional to each state’s percentage of the nation’s high school graduating seniors. Semifinalists are the highest-scoring program entrants in each state and represent the top one percent of the state’s senior students.

We are so thankful to the Lord for Sam and the whole Alders family.

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Sam Alders with famnmsqt


New …

New hill …

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New steps to the field …

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New RA shield in the main hallway …

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New paint …

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New lockers …

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New staff …

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New students …

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Of old You laid the foundation of the earth, and the heavens are the work of Your hands. They will perish, but You will endure; yes, they will all grow old like a garment; like a cloak You will change them, and they will be changed. But You are the same, and Your years will have no end. The children of Your servants will continue, and their descendants will be established before You. (Psalm 102:25-28)