Monthly Archives: November 2018


Hosting Leadership Nacogdoches

On November 15, 2018, Regents Academy was honored to host Leadership Nacogdoches on campus, as a part of the group’s Education Day. Leadership Nacogdoches, sponsored by Nacogdoches Chamber of Commerce, is a “nine-month training program [that] develops new leaders in our community. Participants learn about the driving forces and services in Nacogdoches while developing personal strengths and valuable skills.” We were pleased to work with Dr. Judy Abbott, Dean of SFA’s College of Education, as she coordinated the group’s visit.

The group of community leaders gathered on campus to hear about the mission and work of Regents Academy, as both a private school and a classical Christian school. The visit included large-group presentations, tours of the Grammar and the Logic/Rhetoric Schools, visits to classrooms, and meeting school staff members.

Thank you, Chamber, for serving our community and for including Regents Academy in this wonderful program!

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What Were You Looking For?

Here’s a good word from a friend, Headmaster Ron Gilley, from Trinitas Christian School in Pensacola, Florida. I hope that if you haven’t already made the same discovery he did, you will one day.

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What Were You Looking For? 

When my wife and I first visited the school fourteen years ago, it wasn’t because we were looking for classical education. We were looking for Christian education to be sure, but we didn’t even know enough about classical education to ask a good question about it. Seeing was believing for us that day though, and one tour of the school during a normal day of classes convinced us that this classical education was worth a try.

The truth of the matter is, we had two things in mind for our children: safety and the best education our town had to offer. Our motives were similar to those of most parents, I think. It is a pretty safe bet that we all want our children in a safe and nurturing environment, and most would agree that a good education is important. At that time, though, we weren’t thinking about education as something that molds virtue into young people as they grow. We were thinking about the kind of education that would help our children get into good colleges so they could get good jobs. As time wore on, however, we began to see that not only was this classical Christian education backing up everything we were trying to do with our children at home, it was also taking them further in some ways than we ever could have taken them alone.

Even in the early years of Grammar School our boys were learning about events and characters from history and literature and the Bible that we had been robbed of in our own education. Their learning about these events and characters and biblical principles was challenging what we knew about the world and even challenging who we were. We embraced the challenges and began to learn alongside our boys, to read books we never knew existed, to dig deeper into Scripture, and to challenge our own shallow assumptions about God. We were amazed at the precision of thought our boys had acquired by the time they had worked their way through the Logic School. They were beginning to question what they saw in the world and to make arguments for and against. In the Rhetoric School, they began to mature in every way. Their thought processes began to be informed by more than just logic, more than simply winning an argument. It was as if they began to slowly realize that some questions were so big that the argument could never be won for either side in this life. They became gracious, aware of the fact that they could do nothing to save themselves, that they were dependent upon Christ. And this way of thinking began to shape the way they viewed others. They began to mature into young men who saw this life as something far more important than a time and place to chase what the world, indeed what their own parents only fourteen years earlier, would call success.

My boys are far from perfect, but they are headed in the right direction in many ways as are thousands of classically trained students who graduate every year. What’s more is that the journey our family has taken through classical education, an unexpected journey to be sure, has left us with a very different reward from the one we set out to get, and a far better one. Oh sure, getting into good colleges hasn’t been a problem, but it’s no longer the primary goal. I don’t know what you were looking for when you first came to our school, but I can promise you this: if you open yourself up to the process of classical education, to the goodness of being marinated in God’s holy Word and learning to view all of creation through it, then your reward will be great, even it is different from the one you set out in search of.

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Momentum for the House System

This school year Regents Academy began a new upper school tradition – the House System. The purpose of the House System is to promote a culture of joy, discipleship, and respect among the Logic and Rhetoric School students.  Our hope is that the House System will support strong camaraderie, spiritual growth, unity, and mutual helpfulness among our students.

Logic and Rhetoric students have been divided into four houses: Jerusalem, Rome, Oxford, and Kampala. Each house is led by two seniors working together as House Stewards, with a faculty member as a house sponsor. I am happy to report that good things are going on with our House System! Here are just a few of them:

  • The houses are developing their own identities, not unlike sports teams or clubs. Each house is developing a crest, a Latin slogan, a mascot, house colors, etc.
  • The House Stewards are doing a marvelous job of leading their peers. One of the major purposes of the House System has always been to foster leadership among the students. That is happening as these fine young men and women are showing real leadership.
  • The Houses meet most Fridays for Bible study, praise and worship, prayer, and planning. The House Stewards and other upperclassmen lead these meetings, which gives them the opportunity to disciple those younger than themselves.
  • The students have been told that everyone needs a “Paul,” someone to learn from, and a “Timothy,” someone to encourage. Houses are beginning to pair students up so that they can pray for and encourage each other.
  • Houses can earn points that go toward a yearlong house competition, which is contributing to camaraderie, healthy competition, and accountability.
  • House Stewards have begun to periodically choose Gentlemen of Honor and Ladies of Virtue, members of their houses who have shown excellence and service in conspicuous ways. It is beautiful to see godly behavior and selfless service, not foolishness or bullying behavior, rewarded by the students.
  • Houses are identifying service projects around the school. House members will come together to serve their school later this fall.
  • Students are having fun. A few weeks back the students gathered on the field during lunch to have a House “Peg” tournament (Peg is a game the students love to play). Competition and fun ensued!

We are very thankful for our Logic and Rhetoric School teachers and for Mr. Ben Alexander, who work so hard and are giving the House System a lot of momentum. Lord willing, we will see even more good things come from our new House System in the days ahead!

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