News


Welcome, Ms. Lina Burklin!

Regents Academy is glad to welcome Ms. Lina Burklin to its faculty for the 2019-20 school year.

A native of Longview, Ms. Burklin comes to Regents after teaching middle school for 8 years at Sakeji Mission School in Zambia. She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from LeTourneau University and is a gifted pianist. Ms. Burklin will be teaching Omnibus 1 (Antiquity 1), 7th grade science, and Government.

Ms. Burklin is a talented teacher who loves to learn, and we welcome her!

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Daughters of the Republic of TX Essay Winner

Congratulations to 7th grader Sydney Rotramel for her winning essay in this year’s Daughters of the Republic of Texas (DRT) annual contest.

Sydney’s paper about the Siege of Bexar was chosen from among all county-wide 7th grade entries. She will present her paper at the monthly DRT luncheon held at The Fredonia Hotel. We are very proud of Sydney and her teacher, Mrs. Sherry Wiggins.

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TAPPS Award Winners

Congratulations to Regents Academy high school students who recently participated and won awards in various TAPPS (Texas Association for Private and Parochial Schools) state-level competitions, including art, photography, music, drama, and academic contests. We are very proud of their hard work and the awards they received.

Pictured are: Back row (left to right): Zane Anderson – Persuasive Speaking, Vocal Solo Gold Medalist; Ethan Fairley – Art, Calculator (4th), Advanced Math (5th), Number Sense (6th); Nathan Landrum – Social Studies (8th); Mason Baker – Instrumental Solo (Double Bass) Gold Medalist; Mason Rasberry – Mathematics (6th); Skeeter Gilbreath – Art, Vocal Solo Gold Medalist, Jewelry Design (1st), Photography (2nd – color), Prose Interpretation (2nd); Middle row (left to right): Hannah Alexander – Vocal Solo Gold Medalist, Fall Photo Contest (1st, 5th, 8th); Skyler Houser – Art, Ready Writing; Isabella Baker – Duet Acting, Drawing (7th – color), Mixed Media (Honorable Mention); Anna Claire Powers – Art, Mathematics; Shelby Rotramel – Instrumental Solo (Violin) Gold Medalist; Sydney Cunyus – Art, Duet Acting; Ashlynn McBroom -Poetry; Haley McBroom – Original Oratory; Evan Muir – Prose Interpretation, Vocal Solo Gold Medalist;Front row (left to right): Liane Muir – Duet Acting, Social Studies (1st), Vocal Solo Gold Medalist; Abby Powers – Fall Photo Contest (2nd, 3rd, 6th, 7th), Textile and Fashion Design (2nd & 3rd), Seek & Sketch (Honorable Mention – Color); Leah Vermillion – Art, Duet Acting; Caroline Alders – Duet Acting, Instrumental Solo (Piano) Gold Medalist; Jess Hill – Solo Acting (2nd); Kaden Harman – Instrumental Solo (Piano) Gold Medalist; Anabelle Terrell – Vocal Solo Gold Medalist; Elise Landrum – Instrumental Solo (Piano) Gold Medalist;Not Pictured: Sydney Bryant – Art, Duet Acting; Lilly Hook – Social Studies (3rd), Instrumental Solo (Piano) Gold Medalist 

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“Education ought everywhere to be religious education”

As Christians we all confess, “Jesus Christ is Lord.” Indeed, He is Lord of all. Therefore, He is Lord of our businesses and our homes and our parenting and every other domain. “For He must reign till He has put all enemies under His feet” (1 Cor 15:25). We, as Christian parents, must submit to this truth in our own hearts and lives, and then we must parent and educate our children in light of the reality that Christ is Lord of all.

The Lordship of Christ has ramifications for everything in life, and most certainly for how we educate our children. There is no neutral ground. There is no religious/nonreligious divide, despite the insistence of secularists of various stripes. 

E. Ray Moore from the Exodus Mandate says it well:

Timothy Dwight, President of Yale University from 1795 to 1817, said about the importance of a thoroughly Christian education, “Education ought everywhere to be religious education . . . parents are bound to employ no instructors who will not instruct their children religiously. To commit our children to the care of irreligious people is to commit lambs to the superintendency of wolves.” All education has a religious character as it is inescapably based upon views, articulated or not, related to the nature of God, man and the world. Neutrality in education is impossible.

Let’s stay committed to “a thoroughly Christian education,” as those who follow Christ as Lord in all of life.

Lord, give us grace to be faithful to you. Amen.

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Three Phases of Growth and Three Hymns of the Faith

As we instruct students in our school’s curriculum, Regents teachers also seeking to train them in the formation of godly character. Character is formed in the process of becoming who we are uniquely designed to be: reflections of God. We are not simply seeking to educate young minds; we are seeking to be instruments in God’s hands as He transforms them into the likeness of Christ, who is wisdom and virtue personified.

As a school, there are three major phases in this formative process that correspond to the Trivium. They correspond conceptually to three well-loved hymns.

Grammar School: Trust and Obey

First, we want to establish trusting relationships with children so that they experience the blessings of what it means to trust and obey those in authority. Jesus said, “If you love me, keep my commandments.” (John 14:15) We interpret this to mean that God desires us to initiate the trust of our students by loving them with Christ-like love. As our students respond to the loving leadership of their teachers, they will begin to reap the blessings of obedience and training in wisdom. Ultimately, we are seeking to raise up a generation of leaders who are equipped to lead confidently and with grace. We believe that this means we must first establish a trusting relationship with them, and secondly, we must encourage and equip students in how to live out that trust through obedience and acceptance of personal responsibility. “To be happy in Jesus, is to trust and obey.”

Logic School: Be Thou My Vision

Rather than defining the world by their own standards, we desire for our students to define the world and their view of it by God’s Word. A worldview is the lens by which we view the world. A Christian worldview allows us to view the world with a redemptive focus so that we can respond compassionately and boldly. By teaching our students formal logic and debate starting in logic school, we are seeking to train the way they listen and respond. We want them to be increasingly aware of when words and actions are contradictory, not because we want students to “call others out” but because we want them to be equipped to defend truth. Jesus said that the first contradiction we should be concerned about is with our own words and actions. “Be Thou my wisdom and Thou my true Word.”

Rhetoric School: Onward Christian Soldiers

As our students mature, we want them to be equipped and empowered to make a difference. The world does not need smarter students; it needs servant leaders. We intentionally give our high school students increasing freedom, voice, and responsibility (Eph. 4:13-16). In doing this they begin to see themselves as contributors to our school’s culture rather than viewing themselves as consumers. Serving others, self-denial, and wise stewardship, we believe, are the starting points for biblical leadership. We desire that our students would view themselves as soldiers for the Lord “with the cross of Jesus going on before.”

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Chesterton on the Resurrection of our Lord

G. K. Chesterton had this to say about Easter in his book The Everlasting Man:

On the third day the friends of Christ coming at daybreak to the place found the grave empty and the stone rolled away.  In varying ways they realized the new wonder; but even they hardly realized that the world had died in the night.  What they were looking at was the first day of a new creation, with a new heaven and a new earth; and in a semblance of the gardener God walked again in the garden, in the cool not of the evening but of the dawn.

So Happy New Year, friends. I hope as you walk with the Gardener in the dawn of this coming year you experience the rich blessings of knowing Him and making Him known.

Christ is risen. He is risen indeed!

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Clear and Compelling

Let me invite you to consider three excerpts that, taken together, provide a clear and compelling reason for Christian parents to embrace Christian education for their children. That embrace entails sacrifice and perseverance and devotion, but its eternal consequences are worth it.

Regents Academy can partner with parents with many purposes in education, but we partner most fully with those parents who read these passages and conclude:

  • that Huxley’s proposal is horrifying, 
  • that Van Til’s assertions are inescapable, and 
  • that Moses’ words are binding but ultimately freeing. 

Here are the excerpts in order:

Sir Julian Huxley, advocate and founding father of evolutionary humanism:

Education must be concerned with man’s place and role in nature, and its raw material is man himself . . . a lot of cargo will have to be jettisoned [from the historically Christian model of education, in order to commit to evolutionary humanism] . . . man was not created in his present form a few thousand years ago. Mankind is not descended from Adam and Eve. . . . Children are not born with a load of original sin derived from the Fall. . . . There are no Absolutes of truth or virtue, only possibilities of greater knowledge and fuller perfection. . . . How should the new humanism’s evolutionary approach take effect in education?. . . . [It needs to be] comprehensive, in dealing with every aspect of life; it must have a unitary pattern, reflecting the unity of knowledge and the wholeness of experience. It must attempt to give growing minds a coherent picture of nature and man’s role in it, and to help immature personalities towards integration and self-realization.  (from Essays of a Humanist).

Reformed theologian and professor Cornelius Van Til:

Non-Christian education puts the child in a vacuum. The result is that child dies. Christian education alone really nurtures personality, because it alone gives the child air and food. Modern educational philosophy gruesomely insults our God and our Christ. How, then, do you expect to build anything positively Christian or theistic upon a foundation which is the negation of Christianity and theism? (from “Antithesis in Education,” in Foundations of Christian Education).

Deuteronomy 6:4-9:

“Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one! You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your strength. And these words which I command you today shall be in your heart. You shall teach them diligently to your children, and shall talk of them when you sit in your house, when you walk by the way, when you lie down, and when you rise up. You shall bind them as a sign on your hand, and they shall be as frontlets between your eyes. You shall write them on the doorposts of your house and on your gates.”

Do you find these compelling?

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2019 4-H Officers

A hearty congratulations to the newly elected Regents Academy 4-H Club officers for 2019-2020.

Pictured above (left to right) are Sydney Cunyus, Secretary; Abby Powers, President; Caroline Alders, Parliamentarian; Ethan Fairley, Vice President; and Clayton Terrell, Treasurer.

This great group of student leaders will carry on a tradition of excellent leadership of the Regents 4-H Club. Great job, students!

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The Gain of Serving God

We had a wonderful BIG Serve, with well over 200 students, teachers, and parents going to more than 20 sites around Nacogdoches to serve our neighbors in love. Our school chaplain, Pastor Bryant Tyre, reminded us in Morning Assembly that “It’s not about you!” Instead it’s about serving God, side-by-side with one another, because we want to share the love He has shown us. It is at the core of our mission as a school to train students to serve God and their neighbor, and the BIG Serve is one key way we live out that mission each spring. I am so thankful for the spirit of service, selflessness, and grace that fills our community.

I ran across some good words from Pastor John Piper that remind us all how needful and grace-filled it is to serve the Lord God. This is why we serve Him and why we serve our neighbors at Regents Academy. What we call “Blessed In Giving” is what Pastor Piper calls “The Gain of Serving God.”

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The Gain of Serving God 

By John Piper

“They shall be servants to him, that they may know my service and the service of the kingdoms of the countries.” (2 Chronicles 12:8)

Serving God is utterly different from serving anyone else.

God is extremely jealous that we understand this — and enjoy it. For example, he commands us, “Serve the Lord with gladness!” (Psalm 100:2). There is a reason for this gladness. It is given in Acts 17:25. God is not “served by human hands, as though he needed anything, since he himself gives to all mankind life and breath and everything.”

We serve him with gladness because we do not bear the burden of meeting his needs. He has no needs. So, serving him can’t mean meeting his needs. Instead we rejoice in a service where he meets our needs. Serving God always means receiving grace from God to do what we have to do.

To show how jealous God is for us to understand this, and glory in it, there is a story in 2 Chronicles 12. Rehoboam, the son of Solomon, who ruled the southern kingdom after the revolt of the ten tribes, chose against serving the Lord and gave his service to other gods and other kingdoms.

As judgment, God sent Shishak, the king of Egypt, against Rehoboam with 1,200 chariots and 60,000 horsemen (2 Chronicles 12:2–3).

In mercy God sent the prophet Shemaiah to Rehoboam with this message: “Thus says the Lord, ‘You abandoned me, so I have abandoned you to the hand of Shishak’” (2 Chronicles 12:5). The happy upshot of that message is that Rehoboam and his princes humbled themselves in repentance and said, “The Lord is righteous” (2 Chronicles 12:6).

When the Lord saw that they humbled themselves, he said, “They have humbled themselves. I will not destroy them, but I will grant them some deliverance, and my wrath shall not be poured out on Jerusalem by the hand of Shishak” (2 Chronicles 12:7). But as a discipline to them he says, “They shall be servants to him, that they may know my service and the service of the kingdoms of the countries” (2 Chronicles 12:8).

The point is plain: serving the enemy and serving God are very different. How so? Serving God is a receiving and a blessing and a joy and a benefit. Serving Shishak is exhausting and depleting and sorrowful. God is a giver. Shishak is a taker.

This is why I am so jealous to say that the worship of Sunday morning and the worship of daily obedience is not at bottom a burdensome giving to God, but a joyful getting from God. That is the true service that God demands. In all you do, trust me as the giver.

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Re-Evaluating the Liberal Arts

In a society in which education is routinely confused with a truncated form of vocational training or as secularized ideological indoctrination, the liberal arts have gotten a bad reputation.

A book on the top of my stack these days helps to clarify the liberal arts, revealing them as the center of a powerful paradigm for classical Christian education. The book is The Liberal Arts Tradition: A Philosophy of Christian Classical Education by Kevin Clark and Ravi Scott Jain. I wholeheartedly recommend it.

Philosopher and author Peter Kreeft, in the book’s forward, argues that liberal arts education is no longer “mainstream” education. Rather, “the educational establishment feels deeply threatened by it.” Then he lists what he calls “eight silly objections to [liberal arts education] that are really advertisements for it.” These objections are well worth considering. They take us to the heart of what Regents Academy is striving to accomplish.

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1. It’s “divisive.” It’s not what everyone else is doing. It marches to a different drummer. It cultivates excellence rather than conformity. Yes it does. And this is actually sometimes used as an objection rather than as a selling point!

2. It’s old, outdated, unfashionable. Yes it is, like honor, courage, integrity, and honesty. It doesn’t try to tell the truth with a clock; it doesn’t practice chronological snobbery. In an age which has embraced every novelty, the true rebel is the traditionalist.

3. It’s not in line with modern philosophies: skepticism, cynicism, subjectivism, relativism, naturalism, materialism, reductionism, positivism, scientism, socialism. That’s exactly right. It’s not. It’s countercultural. It harnesses teenagers’ natural proclivity to rebel and turns that force against “the bad guys” who are now the “establishment” instead of against “the good guys.”

4. It’s “judgmental.” It believes there really is good and bad, true and false. The typical modern education is judgmental only against being judgmental, and skeptical of everything except skepticism.

5. It’s small. It’s private. It’s grassroots. It’s implemented mainly in small schools, not big ones. This is true, and it’s another plus rather than a minus. “Small is beautiful.” The bigger the school, the more standardized it has to be and the more the person tends to get lost in the system and get identified with his or her race, economic class, gender, sexual orientation, or political party.

6. It seeks the truth for its own sake, not primarily for pragmatic uses. It aims at wisdom, not wealth. It makes its graduates philosophers instead of millionaires. This is also true. But it’s not a fault. As Chesterton says, “Man’s most practical need is to be more than a pragmatist.”

7. It’s not specialized. It doesn’t include courses on underwater basket weaving or pickling and fermentation (which was actually a major at Ohio State). It doesn’t teach you clever ways to outguess Microsoft Word, or the government, or lawyers, or your professor, or the standardized tests. It just teaches you how to think and how to live. But businesses, law schools, and government agencies don’t want specialist drudges and drones; they want people who can read and write and think logically and creatively.

8. It’s religious. It’s Christian. It doesn’t pretend that the most important man who ever lived never lived, as our public education now does. It assumes that the supernatural is not the enemy to the natural, that “grace perfects nature rather than demeaning it,” as light perfects all colors.

Kreeft closes his forward with these words: “It’s precious – because children are precious.” Amen.

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