Three Phases of Growth and Three Hymns of the Faith


As we instruct students in our school’s curriculum, Regents teachers also seeking to train them in the formation of godly character. Character is formed in the process of becoming who we are uniquely designed to be: reflections of God. We are not simply seeking to educate young minds; we are seeking to be instruments in God’s hands as He transforms them into the likeness of Christ, who is wisdom and virtue personified.

As a school, there are three major phases in this formative process that correspond to the Trivium. They correspond conceptually to three well-loved hymns.

Grammar School: Trust and Obey

First, we want to establish trusting relationships with children so that they experience the blessings of what it means to trust and obey those in authority. Jesus said, “If you love me, keep my commandments.” (John 14:15) We interpret this to mean that God desires us to initiate the trust of our students by loving them with Christ-like love. As our students respond to the loving leadership of their teachers, they will begin to reap the blessings of obedience and training in wisdom. Ultimately, we are seeking to raise up a generation of leaders who are equipped to lead confidently and with grace. We believe that this means we must first establish a trusting relationship with them, and secondly, we must encourage and equip students in how to live out that trust through obedience and acceptance of personal responsibility. “To be happy in Jesus, is to trust and obey.”

Logic School: Be Thou My Vision

Rather than defining the world by their own standards, we desire for our students to define the world and their view of it by God’s Word. A worldview is the lens by which we view the world. A Christian worldview allows us to view the world with a redemptive focus so that we can respond compassionately and boldly. By teaching our students formal logic and debate starting in logic school, we are seeking to train the way they listen and respond. We want them to be increasingly aware of when words and actions are contradictory, not because we want students to “call others out” but because we want them to be equipped to defend truth. Jesus said that the first contradiction we should be concerned about is with our own words and actions. “Be Thou my wisdom and Thou my true Word.”

Rhetoric School: Onward Christian Soldiers

As our students mature, we want them to be equipped and empowered to make a difference. The world does not need smarter students; it needs servant leaders. We intentionally give our high school students increasing freedom, voice, and responsibility (Eph. 4:13-16). In doing this they begin to see themselves as contributors to our school’s culture rather than viewing themselves as consumers. Serving others, self-denial, and wise stewardship, we believe, are the starting points for biblical leadership. We desire that our students would view themselves as soldiers for the Lord “with the cross of Jesus going on before.”

Share this:

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *