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What is your vision for your children?

Who is a good fit to be a Regents family? 

Without a doubt, there are many ways to answer that question, but certainly one good answer is this: a Regents family is a family who has a distinctively biblical and Christian vision for their children. These families want something more than just a safe environment with Christian teachers and a good college prep curriculum that produces high test scores and college entrances. Rather, a Regents family merely begins with these things. They parent with eternity in view. They see the long term and know that in the blink of an eye, their children will be young adults about to go out into the world. They envision their children bearing the fruit of a long, worthy journey through a classical Christian education that influences their souls and minds for Christ, shapes their worldview, molds virtue, and inspires a lifelong love for learning. 

In short, what is your vision for your children? The school publishes its vision for its graduates. Take a moment and consider this vision as worthy aims for you as parents. When we partner together, humbly and prayerfully, committed to Christ and His church, God can work mightily in the lives of our children over the years they are under our mutual care.

We envision that a graduate of the academic program at Regents Academy will embody the following traits:

  • Virtue and mature character: This includes heart-obedience rather than mere rule-following, good manners, honorable relationships, self-control, and Christian leadership. If nothing else, students should live in accordance with Coram Deo—living as though they were in the presence of God at all times.
  • Sound reason and sound faith: We expect students to realize a unified Christian worldview with Scripture as the measure of all Truth. We expect them to exhibit the wisdom to recognize complex issues and to follow the consequences of ideas.         
  • Service to others: We expect our graduates to “love their neighbor” by serving others in their community.  Graduates need to develop an awareness of the many types of needs that others around them have and learn to be like Christ in their willingness to minister to others.        
  • A masterful command of language: Because language enables us to know things that are not directly experienced, nothing is more important within Christian education. Without a strong command of language, even Scripture is rendered mute. As people of “the Word,” Christians should be masters of language. Students master vocabulary, grammar, usage, and translation through our study of Latin, English, and Spanish.  
  • Well-rounded competence: Educated people are not specialists who know little outside of their field of specialty. Educated people have competence in a variety of areas including fine arts, drama, music, physical activity, history, logic, science, and arithmetic. Throughout our program, skills essential for an educated person are introduced and developed.        
  • Literacy with broad exposure to books: Educated people are well-read and able to discuss and relate to central works of literature, science, art, architecture, and music. 
  • An established aesthetic: Further, educated people have good taste, formed as they are exposed to great aesthetic masterpieces, particularly at a young age.
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What Really Matters

Here are some wise words from author and professor Peter Kreeft, author of Before I Go: Letters to Our Children about What Really Matters.

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One of the stupidest songs I ever heard on TV was the theme song of a kids’ show of the seventies, “The Electric Company.” It said: “The most important person in the whole wide world is – you!” Implied message: be a self-centered little spoiled brat. You’re number one, everyone else is number two.

Here is an alternative philosophy:

  1. The most important person is God. This is necessarily true as 2 + 2 = 4. It is true whether you know it or not, whether you like it or not, whether you believe it or not. So you’d better learn to know it and like it and believe it.
  2. The second most important person in the world is the person you marry. Nobody else comes even close. That’s what marriage is. If you don’t know that, you’re not really married.
  3. Next come your kids.
  4. Then comes yourself. Take care of yourself before taking care of anyone else except your kids, your spouse, and your God. Because if you don’t inflate your own oxygen mask first, you won’t be able to help others inflate theirs.
  5. Then comes your friends. Never betray a friend.
  6. Then comes everyone else you know, your “neighbors.”
  7. Then comes the rest of the world.
  8. Then comes things, any and all things: money, the things money can buy – houses, cars, vacations. Stuff. (Remember George Carlin’s routine about “stuff.”) Always, people before things. Use things and love people, not vice versa.
  9. Finally, abstractions: ideas, causes, organizations, political parties, etc. they are means to the rest as ends. By the way, the Church is not an “organization,” it’s a family. I never saw “organized religion,” only disorganized religion, like Noah’s ark.
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Celebrating 100 Days of Kindergarten with Heartbeat

Each year the Kindergarten class celebrates their 100th day of school by collecting supplies for Heartbeat Pregnancy Center in Nacogdoches. This year the kindergarteners, with the help of the Regents students and families, collected more than 100 newborn hats, bibs, diapers, onesies and other baby items to donate to our friends at Heartbeat.

Great job, kindergarten class!

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TAPPS Fall Photography Awards

Congratulations to Regents senior Hannah Alexander and junior Abby Powers! These ladies entered and placed in numerous categories of the TAPPS Fall Photography Contest. Hannah brought home first place in Cityscape/Urban Architecture. Abby medaled with third in both Scenic/Landscape and Cityscape/Urban Architecture. We are proud of their accomplishments!

(TAPPS stands for the Texas Association of Private and Parochial Schools)

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DAR Writing Contest Winners

We are happy to announce the Regents Academy students who won awards in this year’s Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) writing contests.

Eighth grade student Quint Middlebrook won second place with his essay for this year’s American History essay contest. 

In the Junior American Citizens (JAC) division of the DAR, we had a winner as well: Piper Jobe,  first place winner in the Short Story category for 5th grade.

We are very proud of both Quint and Piper. Congratulations! Of course, we know these winning papers get a little help from the teachers who oversee these efforts, so we also congratulate 8th grade writing teacher, Mrs. Wiggins, and 5th grade teacher, Mrs. Cunyus. Thank you, wonderful teachers! And congratulations, students and parents!

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Reward for the Diligent

The inimitable Bill Watterson places wise words in the mouth of Calvin’s teacher, Mrs. Wormwood. “What you get out of school depends on what you put into it.” This is to say that the wise and diligent student is rewarded, both when receiving his education and beyond as well.

The Bible commends hard work by promising great reward for the diligent. “He who has a slack hand becomes poor, but the hand of the diligent makes rich” (Prov 10:4). The Bible also exhorts us to diligence. “Be diligent to present yourself approved to God, a worker who does not need to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth” (2 Tim 2:15). The motive for our hard work is to be the glory of God in Christ. “And whatever you do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through Him” (Col 3:17).

But the Bible acknowledges a strange paradox: the lazy person is the hardest working person of all. “The hand of the diligent will rule, but the lazy man will be put to forced labor” (Proverbs 12:24). The man who works the hardest – is “put to forced labor” – is the man who has the least motivation and diligence. Because he refuses to work hard on his own, he ends up working hard as another man’s slave. The applications to education here are important. Education, properly understood, is freeing.
Education is fitting for free men and women, not for slaves. The hard work and diligence that must accompany study is for the purpose of the freedom that learned people enjoy – freedom of mind and spirit and also freedom from the drudgery of manual labor.

But there is a practical application as well. C.S. Lewis captures it wonderfully in Mere Christianity:

Teachers will tell you that the laziest boy in the class is the one who works the hardest in the end. They mean this. If you give two students, say, a proposition in geometry to do, the one who is prepared to take the trouble will try to understand it. The lazy student will learn it by heart because, for the moment, that needs less effort. But six months later, when they are preparing for the exam, that lazy student is doing hours and hours of
miserable drudgery over things the other student understands, and positively enjoys, in a few minutes. Laziness means more work in the long run.

All of this is to say that Regents Academy is a place that seeks to honor the biblical principles of diligence and hard work. Look in a classroom, and you’ll see students working industriously, with diligence as the norm. Lord willing, the result will be that learning is freeing and those who are being taught to learn are being prepared for a lifetime of ruling and not being ruled.

Hard work will then be its own reward.

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The Lesser Known Demon

Here are some wise words from teacher and author Josh Gibbs at the Circe Institute blog: “The Lesser Known Demon.”

There are two kinds of demons. Nearly everyone is familiar with the first kind. Almost no one is familiar with the second kind.

The first kind of demon is simply the demon of folklore. He comes to tempt, to whisper lies, to deceive a man into rejecting God. The first kind of demon is a Baal or a Dagon, who con men and distract them from the truth. Such demons betake themselves to bridges and cliffs and invite innocent passersby to leap off for no good reason. These are the malevolent beings who suddenly fling foul thoughts into a man’s head so that he will needlessly question himself, form a base opinion of himself, and act accordingly. We have read of such demons in Scripture, for they throw children into fire or water, or incite a man to cut himself with stones. These demons are commonly known by every nation of the world, Christian and heathen alike.

However, there is another variety of demon whose work is wholly unlike the first, for he is not a tempter or liar. The first kind of demon is highly intellectual, and, as Milton suggests in Paradise Lost, has been meticulously studying mankind for nearly eight thousand years now. The first kind has a file on you which is several feet thick. He knows your weaknesses, your strengths, and perpetually strategizes on how best to snatch your love of God. The second variety of demon is not so cunning, though. The second variety of demon does not labor to trick a man into sinning, but simply helps him get away with the sin he has already committed.

This demon has a name in the infernal kingdom. He is known as a cellar demon, for any sin which a man gets away with is cellared in his soul to ferment and grow rich and heady. While not all demons are of one mind on the matter, a great many fiends would prefer a man not commit a certain sin than that he commit that sin and immediately be found out. Demons are not so impatient as you might have been led to believe. For instance, if a demon has the chance to tempt a man to drunkenness on a Friday night, yet knows the man will be caught, or the demon can wait until Sunday evening to do his tempting, and knows the man will not get caught then, well, the average demon will wait. Many thousands of years ago, the much-celebrated demon Belial wrote a highly influential book entitled Stored Up Wrath. The very famous first line of that book is, “I play the long game,” and to this day, lesser demons encourage one another with those words on a daily basis.

You see, nothing mucks up the work of a demon quite like his subject getting caught, for getting caught leads to punishments, self-reflection, witnesses, the loss of anonymity. Contrary to what most human beings think, getting caught usually restores community and reinforces crumbling bonds of unity. There is little which is truer in a man’s soul than his deep-down yearning to be found out, for a man cannot be known until he is found, and every man wants to be known.

Cellar demons are not free, and tempters must hire them at exorbitant rates. A cellar demon is like an insurance policy which is taken out after a successful round of temptation. The cellar demon comes along and covers over a fellow’s tracks, brushes evidence under the rug, alerts the sinner to remove certain clues, directs the attention of the authorities to different matters. Teenage boys often believe themselves far more clever and sneaky than they truly are— it is rarely their own craftiness which allows them to get away with sin, and far more often the work of cellar demons. Cellar demons charge more to conceal the sins of teenage boys than they do the sins of housewives or the elderly, but tempters always pay up. Cellared sin is simply that valuable in the teenage soul. 

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Hosting Leadership Nacogdoches

On November 15, 2018, Regents Academy was honored to host Leadership Nacogdoches on campus, as a part of the group’s Education Day. Leadership Nacogdoches, sponsored by Nacogdoches Chamber of Commerce, is a “nine-month training program [that] develops new leaders in our community. Participants learn about the driving forces and services in Nacogdoches while developing personal strengths and valuable skills.” We were pleased to work with Dr. Judy Abbott, Dean of SFA’s College of Education, as she coordinated the group’s visit.

The group of community leaders gathered on campus to hear about the mission and work of Regents Academy, as both a private school and a classical Christian school. The visit included large-group presentations, tours of the Grammar and the Logic/Rhetoric Schools, visits to classrooms, and meeting school staff members.

Thank you, Chamber, for serving our community and for including Regents Academy in this wonderful program!

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2018 Unsung Heroes

The recipients of the 2018 Unsung Hero Award are Dr. and Mrs. Kyle  and Becky McMorries. Through Kyle and Becky’s generosity and service, Regents Academy was able to provide Chromebook labs for Logic and Rhetoric School students and upgraded infrastructure to support the new technology.

The Regents Board expressed their gratitude and appreciation for the McMorries at the school’s Academic Awards Ceremony on May 29, 2018.

Thank you for your selfless service, Kyle and Becky!

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