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A Miscellany of Wise Quotes

Christopher Perrin, from An Introduction to Classical Education:

What makes a classic? The word classic is flexible and ambiguous. It derives from the Latin word classis, which originally meant a “fleet of ships.” It came to refer to groups of people—classes of people. In English it preserves this meaning as in a class of 1st graders. It also has a connotation that means of the highest order—something classy is very good or first class. The Latin word classicus referred to the highest class of Roman citizens. The word classic preserves this meaning of being the very best. Thus scholars like Mortimer Adler refer to classics as books of enduring value. Books that are called “great books” are usually synonymous with “classics.” However, books that are classics are enduring works, meaning they are older works, proven by positive assessment over time. It is possible for a new book to be a great book, but only after wide, critical acclaim and influence. It will take time, however, for new great books to become classics, if indeed they pass the test. Charles Van Doren referred to great books as “the books that never have to be written again.”

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Russell Kirk:

…being educated, they will know that they do not know everything; and that there exist objects in life besides power and money and sensual gratification; they will take long views; they will look backward to ancestors and forward to posterity.For them, education will not terminate on commencement day.

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John Buchan:

Our greatest inheritance, the very foundation of our civilization, is a marvel to behold and consider. If I tried to describe its rich legacy with utmost brevity, I should take the Latin word humanitas. It represents in the widest sense, the accumulated harvest of the ages; it is the fine flower of a long discipline of Christian thought. It is the Western mind of which we ought to turn our attentions to careful study.

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Sir Philip Sidney (1595)

This purifying of wit, this enriching of memory, enabling of judgment, and enlarging of conceit, which commonly we call learning, under what name soever it come forth or to what immediate end soever it be directed, the final end is to lead and draw us to as high a perfection as our degenerate souls, made worse by their clay lodgings, can be capable of.

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Congratulations, All-Region Musicians!

Six Regents Academy students were recently selected for the Texas Music Educators Association Region 4/21 orchestras.

Tenth grader Shelby Rotramel and ninth grader Mason Baker were selected from dozens of violinists and bassists who auditioned for the All-Region high school orchestra. Eighth graders Karys Alders, Haylee Harmen, and Holden Kelly were selected for the middle school orchestra violin section. Seventh grader Cate Baker was selected for middle school viola.
Congratulations, students! We are very proud of you!
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Hosting Leadership Nacogdoches

On November 15, 2018, Regents Academy was honored to host Leadership Nacogdoches on campus, as a part of the group’s Education Day. Leadership Nacogdoches, sponsored by Nacogdoches Chamber of Commerce, is a “nine-month training program [that] develops new leaders in our community. Participants learn about the driving forces and services in Nacogdoches while developing personal strengths and valuable skills.” We were pleased to work with Dr. Judy Abbott, Dean of SFA’s College of Education, as she coordinated the group’s visit.

The group of community leaders gathered on campus to hear about the mission and work of Regents Academy, as both a private school and a classical Christian school. The visit included large-group presentations, tours of the Grammar and the Logic/Rhetoric Schools, visits to classrooms, and meeting school staff members.

Thank you, Chamber, for serving our community and for including Regents Academy in this wonderful program!

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What Were You Looking For?

Here’s a good word from a friend, Headmaster Ron Gilley, from Trinitas Christian School in Pensacola, Florida. I hope that if you haven’t already made the same discovery he did, you will one day.

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What Were You Looking For? 

When my wife and I first visited the school fourteen years ago, it wasn’t because we were looking for classical education. We were looking for Christian education to be sure, but we didn’t even know enough about classical education to ask a good question about it. Seeing was believing for us that day though, and one tour of the school during a normal day of classes convinced us that this classical education was worth a try.

The truth of the matter is, we had two things in mind for our children: safety and the best education our town had to offer. Our motives were similar to those of most parents, I think. It is a pretty safe bet that we all want our children in a safe and nurturing environment, and most would agree that a good education is important. At that time, though, we weren’t thinking about education as something that molds virtue into young people as they grow. We were thinking about the kind of education that would help our children get into good colleges so they could get good jobs. As time wore on, however, we began to see that not only was this classical Christian education backing up everything we were trying to do with our children at home, it was also taking them further in some ways than we ever could have taken them alone.

Even in the early years of Grammar School our boys were learning about events and characters from history and literature and the Bible that we had been robbed of in our own education. Their learning about these events and characters and biblical principles was challenging what we knew about the world and even challenging who we were. We embraced the challenges and began to learn alongside our boys, to read books we never knew existed, to dig deeper into Scripture, and to challenge our own shallow assumptions about God. We were amazed at the precision of thought our boys had acquired by the time they had worked their way through the Logic School. They were beginning to question what they saw in the world and to make arguments for and against. In the Rhetoric School, they began to mature in every way. Their thought processes began to be informed by more than just logic, more than simply winning an argument. It was as if they began to slowly realize that some questions were so big that the argument could never be won for either side in this life. They became gracious, aware of the fact that they could do nothing to save themselves, that they were dependent upon Christ. And this way of thinking began to shape the way they viewed others. They began to mature into young men who saw this life as something far more important than a time and place to chase what the world, indeed what their own parents only fourteen years earlier, would call success.

My boys are far from perfect, but they are headed in the right direction in many ways as are thousands of classically trained students who graduate every year. What’s more is that the journey our family has taken through classical education, an unexpected journey to be sure, has left us with a very different reward from the one we set out to get, and a far better one. Oh sure, getting into good colleges hasn’t been a problem, but it’s no longer the primary goal. I don’t know what you were looking for when you first came to our school, but I can promise you this: if you open yourself up to the process of classical education, to the goodness of being marinated in God’s holy Word and learning to view all of creation through it, then your reward will be great, even it is different from the one you set out in search of.

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Momentum for the House System

This school year Regents Academy began a new upper school tradition – the House System. The purpose of the House System is to promote a culture of joy, discipleship, and respect among the Logic and Rhetoric School students.  Our hope is that the House System will support strong camaraderie, spiritual growth, unity, and mutual helpfulness among our students.

Logic and Rhetoric students have been divided into four houses: Jerusalem, Rome, Oxford, and Kampala. Each house is led by two seniors working together as House Stewards, with a faculty member as a house sponsor. I am happy to report that good things are going on with our House System! Here are just a few of them:

  • The houses are developing their own identities, not unlike sports teams or clubs. Each house is developing a crest, a Latin slogan, a mascot, house colors, etc.
  • The House Stewards are doing a marvelous job of leading their peers. One of the major purposes of the House System has always been to foster leadership among the students. That is happening as these fine young men and women are showing real leadership.
  • The Houses meet most Fridays for Bible study, praise and worship, prayer, and planning. The House Stewards and other upperclassmen lead these meetings, which gives them the opportunity to disciple those younger than themselves.
  • The students have been told that everyone needs a “Paul,” someone to learn from, and a “Timothy,” someone to encourage. Houses are beginning to pair students up so that they can pray for and encourage each other.
  • Houses can earn points that go toward a yearlong house competition, which is contributing to camaraderie, healthy competition, and accountability.
  • House Stewards have begun to periodically choose Gentlemen of Honor and Ladies of Virtue, members of their houses who have shown excellence and service in conspicuous ways. It is beautiful to see godly behavior and selfless service, not foolishness or bullying behavior, rewarded by the students.
  • Houses are identifying service projects around the school. House members will come together to serve their school later this fall.
  • Students are having fun. A few weeks back the students gathered on the field during lunch to have a House “Peg” tournament (Peg is a game the students love to play). Competition and fun ensued!

We are very thankful for our Logic and Rhetoric School teachers and for Mr. Ben Alexander, who work so hard and are giving the House System a lot of momentum. Lord willing, we will see even more good things come from our new House System in the days ahead!

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Top Butter Braid Sellers

Congratulations to our TOP SELLERS in this year’s Butter Braid campaign! The Jobe, Taylor, and Campbell families each sold more than $400 worth of pastries, and the Goff family sold more than $500 worth of pastries! Altogether, Regents Academy students and families sold more than 600 pastries, earning just over $3,500 for the purchase of new TV monitor screens for the Upper School classrooms.
We are so grateful for the efforts of ALL who sold Butter Braid this year — and we are very thankful for all of our friends who purchased them!

(Pictured, from left, are Tori and Piper Jobe, Reagan Taylor, Ella Campbell and Jacob Goff)

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“A Uniquely Human Ability”

From classicalchristian.org and www.thepublicdiscourse.com:

Casey Shutt writes on how the classical Christian approach offers a fundamentally different vision of education that families fed up with a factory approach to learning find compelling:

“Dewey’s dictum on the importance of a practical education lives on. The elimination of cursive from many school curricula is rooted in the notion that cursive has lost its utility; after all, people now spend most of their lives typing. A pragmatic understanding of education finds it difficult to justify the place of cursive (or any type of handwriting) in a school curriculum, just as fast food restaurants don’t bother with hors d’oeuvres. However, broaden the scope of education, and cursive and handwriting become of critical importance. Andrew Kern of the Circe Institute roots the value of learning cursive within education’s historic and broader purpose of ‘cultivat[ing] the human-ness of the student.’ Kern continues, ‘Handwriting is a uniquely human ability. No other animal has ever been able to imitate it, much less come up with it.’ But modern education shrinks the students down to their potential instrumentality within the economy. Consequently, the fluid grace of cursive is easily replaced by the pragmatic peck of keys.”

And that is one reason, among others why we teach cursive handwriting at Regents Academy.

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State Champs!

The Regents Academy Eagles soccer team won the 2018 state championship with a win over Concordia High School by a score of 2-1 in double overtime.

The team celebrated with a victory parade and pep rally at school when they got home.

Congratulations to coaches Rick Bertke and Jonathan Landrum, to all the parents and students who traveled to Round Rock to cheer the team on, and to all the Regents students and teachers who watched via live stream at school.

Way to go, Eagles!

 

 

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