Repairing the Ruins Conference 2018

What are your summer plans? I have a great idea for you, Regents parents. Come with us to the ACCS 2018 Repairing the Ruins Conference.

The Association of Classical and Christian Schools 2018 annual conference is in Frisco (near Dallas) this year. Most of our teachers, staff, and board will be attending the conference on June 21-23. The conference truly is an amazing experience for teachers, administrators, board members — and parents alike. You’ll catch the classical vision from inspiring and profoundly insightful speakers, connect with other parents and teachers, and learn more than you’d ever thought you could know about classical Christian education. At the conference you really get the sense that we are part of a movement that God is bringing about to renew and redeem education.

Please go to to learn more and to register. Repairing the Ruins will be an investment in your children’s education and well worth your time and money.

VFW Patriot’s Pen Essay Contest Winners

Congratulations to Regents Academy for sweeping this year’s Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Patriot’s Pen essay contest once again.

VFW Post #3893 Commander Don Kirkley presented plaques and checks to this year’s winners, who wrote essays celebrating “America’s Gift to My Generation.” Winning first place for her essay was 8th grader Sydney Cunyus, daughter of Michael and Lori Cunyus. Placing second was 8th grader Isabella Baker, daughter of Dr. Richard and Cherry Baker. Placing third was 7th grader Karys Alders, daughter of David and Nicole Alders.
Pictured (from left) are Isabella Baker, Don Kirkley, Sydney Cunyus, and Karys Alders.

Texas Outdoor Writer’s Association Essay Contest Winners

Congratulations to our Regents Academy students, who won four of the six places in this year’s Texas Outdoor Writer’s Association (TOWA) youth essay contest!

The students write about a favorite outdoor experience and are judged from other entries in their division from around the state. In the junior high division, eighth grader Carolyn Young placed 2nd, and seventh grader Karys Alders tied for 3rd place. In the high school division, eleventh grader Luke Riley won first place, and ninth grader Leah Vermillion won 3rd place. Luke won a new laptop computer, and the other students will be awarded cash prizes for their winning entries.
We are so pleased to see our students awarded for their work inside and outside the classroom.

Spelling Bee Champs!

Regents Academy enjoyed success at the annual five-county district Spelling Bee sponsored by the Lufkin Kiwanis Club. Seventh grader Noah Satir, son of Dr. Cengiz and Dr. Vicki Satir, placed second in the individual official Scripps spelling bee. The fourth grade team led by Meena Shanmugam, along with teammates Jericho Maness and Nicholas Shatwell, won first place in their 1st-5th grade team division.

We are very proud of these stellar spellers!

Real Comfort

Quotes from Instruments in the Redeemer’s Hands: People in Need of Change Helping People in Need of Change by Paul David Tripp.


We forget that God’s primary goal is not changing our situations or relationships so that we can be happy, but changing us through our situations and relationships so that we will be holy.

Human beings by their very nature are worshipers. Worship is not something we do; it defines who we are. You cannot divide human beings into those who worship and those who don’t. Everybody worships; it’s just a matter of what, or whom, we serve.

Embedded in the larger story of redemption is a principle we must not miss: God uses ordinary people to do extraordinary things in the lives of others.

Real comfort is found when I understand that I am held in the hollow of the hand of the One who created and rules all things. The most valuable thing in my life is God’s love, a love that no one can take away. When my identity is rooted in him, the storms of trouble will not blow me away.

Mrs. Lara Sowell Featured on KTRE

We are so proud of or much-beloved Latin teacher, Mrs. Lara Sowell, for the work she does as president of the Lone Star Chapter of the National Federation of the Blind of Texas. KTRE recently broadcast a story about a mobile app called NFB-NEWSLINE that featured Mrs. Sowell.

Here is the link to the KTRE story.

We appreciate you, Mrs. Sowell, and admire your courage and dedication!


Love Is …

Each school day at Regents Academy, we, like all those who worship God in Christ, talk about love: we read and quote what the Bible says about love, we exhort the students to love one another, we discuss and show ways to love and prefer others, and we correct students who are not loving others. But, of course, the word “love” in our culture has been sentimentalized, trivialized, and romanticized by a million mindless pop songs, romcoms, and greeting cards into seemingly utter meaninglessness. Valentine’s Day is a wonderful tradition, but you have to admit that it does little to give us biblical clarity about what love really is! So, What is love? I love (wink wink) what Paul David Tripp had to say about love in his online devotional this week. “24 Things That Love Is” beautifully and powerfully captures so much of what the Bible teaches about what love really is and what it really means for us to love others.


What is love?

You won’t find the best answer on the pages of Wikipedia, Merriam-Webster or Shakespeare. No, the best definition of love was established at an event, the most important event in human history: the cross of the Lord Jesus Christ.

Christ’s sacrifice of love is the ultimate example of what love is and what love does. Here’s a definition I like to use:

Love is willing self-sacrifice for the good of another that does not require reciprocation or that the person being loved is deserving.

If we are followers of Jesus Christ and believe in the cross for salvation, then our words and actions and responses must be motivated by cruciform love. That is, love that shapes itself to the cross of the Lord Jesus Christ (cruci = “cross” and form = “in the shape of”).

On this Valentine’s Day, here are 23 more ways that you can express cruciform love in your daily living.

  1. LOVE IS being willing to have your life complicated by the needs and struggles of others without impatience or anger.
  1. LOVE IS actively fighting the temptation to be critical and judgmental toward another while looking for ways to encourage and praise.
  1. LOVE IS making a daily commitment to resist the needless moments of conflict that come from pointing out and responding to minor offenses.
  1. LOVE IS being lovingly honest and humbly approachable in times of misunderstanding.
  1. LOVE IS being more committed to unity and understanding than you are to winning, accusing, or being right.
  1. LOVE IS a making a daily commitment to admit your sin, weakness, and failure and to resist the temptation to offer an excuse or shift the blame.
  1. LOVE IS being willing, when confronted by another, to examine your heart rather than rising to your defense or shifting the focus.
  1. LOVE IS making a daily commitment to grow in love so that the love you offer to another is increasingly selfless, mature, and patient.
  1. LOVE IS being unwilling to do what is wrong when you have been wronged, but looking for concrete and specific ways to overcome evil with good.
  1. LOVE IS being a good student of another, looking for their physical, emotional, and spiritual needs so that in some way you can remove the burden, support them as they carry it, or encourage them along the way.
  1. LOVE IS being willing to invest the time necessary to discuss, examine, and understand the relational problems you face, staying on task until the problem is removed or you have agreed upon a strategy of response.
  1. LOVE IS being willing to always ask for forgiveness and always being committed to grant forgiveness when it is requested.
  1. LOVE IS recognizing the high value of trust in a relationship and being faithful to your promises and true to your word.
  1. LOVE IS speaking kindly and gently, even in moments of disagreement, refusing to attack the other person’s character or assault their intelligence.
  1. LOVE IS being unwilling to flatter, lie, manipulate, or deceive in any way in order to co-opt the other person into giving you what you want or doing something your way.
  1. LOVE IS being unwilling to ask another person to be the source of your identity, meaning, and purpose, or inner sense of well-being, while refusing to be the source of theirs.
  1. LOVE IS the willingness to have less free time, less sleep, and a busier schedule in order to be faithful to what God has called you to be and to do as a spouse, parent, neighbor, etc.
  1. LOVE IS a commitment to say no to selfish instincts and to do everything that is within your ability to promote real unity, functional understanding, and active love in your relationships.
  1. LOVE IS staying faithful to your commitment to treat another with appreciation, respect, and grace, even in moments when the other person doesn’t seem deserving or is unwilling to reciprocate.
  1. LOVE IS the willingness to make regular and costly sacrifices for the sake of a relationship without asking for anything in return or using your sacrifices to place the other person in your debt.
  1. LOVE IS being unwilling to make any personal decision or choice that would harm a relationship, hurt the other person, or weaken the bond of trust between you.
  1. LOVE IS refusing to be self-focused or demanding, but instead looking for specific ways to serve, support, and encourage, even when you are busy or tired.
  1. LOVE IS daily admitting to yourself, the other person, and God that you are unable to be driven by a cruciform love without God’s protecting, providing, forgiving, rescuing, and delivering grace.

7 Things Teachers Wish Parents Knew

I’m a teacher. I often think about my students’ parents and wonder about their perceptions of my classes or me as a teacher. I’m also a parent. I often think about my children’s teachers and wonder what perceptions they have about me as a parent. I’m quite sure they often wonder, “What exactly goes on in that Bryant house every night?!”

It’s a delicate thing, this relationship between teachers and parents, and parents and teachers. I’m so glad our relationships at Regents Academy are so constructive and peaceful so much of the time. But it’s always good to think about ways to work together better, for the benefit of the formation of our children. In that spirit, I offer these “7 Things Teachers Wish Parents Knew,” compiled by Lisa Collier Cool for Good Housekeeping. I hope they’re helpful for you, as they were for me.

  1. Don’t be a stranger!

Talk to your child’s teacher early and often. Back-to-school night shouldn’t be the only time you connect, but it’s a great time to introduce yourself and find out the best way to contact her in the future. Then stay in touch with updates on how things are going at home, questions about your child and his work, or to schedule conferences to head off trouble (should you worry about that string of C’s?). Most teachers have e-mail at school, which is a great way to check in.

  1. Learning doesn’t stop at 3:15.

You can help the teacher do a better job by encouraging your child to show you something he’s working on at school, suggests Ron Martucci, who teaches fourth grade in Pelham, New York. It doesn’t have to be a big deal: “Ask him to demonstrate how he does long division or to read his book report out loud,” says Martucci. “Every time your child gets a chance to show off what he knows, it builds confidence.”

  1. Keep your child organized.

That means helping teachers with the paper chase. “I spend way too much time tracking down tests or forms I’ve sent home for a parent’s signature,” says Judy Powell, a fifth-grade teacher from Richmond, Virginia. Usually, the missing items are crumpled up in the bottom of the child’s backpack, along with lunch leftovers and other clutter. Powell’s solution: Have your child empty his backpack every day as part of a regular after-school routine. Set up a special place, such as a box in the kitchen, where he can put the day’s papers, and provide another spot, such as a desk drawer, for old assignments that you want to save. A bright-colored folder is a good idea, too, for toting homework and signed papers to and from school. And about those supplies: Keep plenty on hand. “Kids run out of pencils and paper, and it’ll be three weeks before they’ll remember to tell you,” says Powell.

  1. Let your child make mistakes.

Don’t forget, he’s learning. Teachers don’t want perfect students, they want students who try hard. “Sometimes parents get caught up in thinking every assignment has to be done exactly right, and they put too much pressure on their child,” says Brian Freeman, a second-grade teacher from Red Spring, North Carolina. “But it’s OK for kids to get some problems wrong. It’s important for us to see what students don’t know, so we can go over the material again.” Is your child struggling with an assignment? Help him brainstorm possible solutions. If he’s still stuck, resist the temptation to write a note. Instead, encourage your child to take charge by asking the teacher for help the next day. Hands off bigger assignments, too, says Marty Kaminsky, a fourth-grade teacher in Ithaca, New York. “I assigned a project on inventors, and several kids brought in amazingly detailed reports with slide-shows. They looked great, but they clearly weren’t the work of a nine-year-old,” he says. “I was much happier with the posters with the pictures glued on crooked, because I knew those children did the work themselves. What matters isn’t the final result; it’s letting a child have ownership of the project.”

  1. If the teacher deserves a good grade, give her one.

Teaching isn’t easy, and there are days when a child has a bad day, or a teacher feels like crying because a parent speaks to her harshly. So why not e-mail or call when your child enjoys a class event or says something nice about the instructor? And if you feel the teacher is doing a good job, let the principal know. Volunteering is another way to demonstrate your enthusiasm and support, even if you only have time to help out once a year. It shows your child, and his teacher, that you really care about his education.

  1. Stay involved, even when you don’t know the material.

You can provide moral support and be your child’s cheerleader no matter how well (or poorly) you did in a certain subject. “Parents tell me they didn’t take trigonometry or flunked chemistry, so how can they check the homework?” says Tim Devine, a high school social science teacher in Chicago. “But we don’t expect you to be an expert on every subject.” Just knowing a parent is paying attention can be very motivating for a student.

  1. The teacher’s on your side, give her the benefit of the doubt.

Rachel James, a third-grade teacher in Reson, Florida, was having a hard time with one of her students. For days, the boy had been disruptive, rolling his eyes and sighing dramatically whenever anyone spoke to him. Naturally, she had to reprimand him. “His mom called and accused me of picking on her son,” says James. “When I told her what was going on, she was shocked.” After the mom had calmed down, they worked out some ways to change the boy’s behavior. “A lot of parents go into attack mode when their child complains about a teacher,” says James. “Or they take the problem to the principal, so the teacher feels blindsided. But parents need to get all the facts before they react.”


Thanks for showing so much appreciation and understanding of your child’s teachers, Regents parents!